Winkleby Lab In the Prevention Research Center

Copyright 1998 Chicago Tribune Company  

November 1, 1998 Sunday, CHICAGOLAND FINAL EDITION
SECTION: WOMANEWS; Pg. 9; ZONE: CN

RACIAL GAP IN HEART DISEASE

(Reuters)

Black and Mexican-American women face a greater risk of cardiovascular disease than white women do, including poor ones, researchers have found.

Stanford University researchers were testing the hypothesis that status, measured principally by education level, would be the key factor in determining which women develop cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death among women in the United States.

Although class level did affect the incidence of cardiovascular disease, it did not explain the significant differences between white women and both black and Mexican-American women in determining risk, researcher Marilyn Winkleby wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study of 5,266 women suggested that ethnic variations in risk -- as measured by blood pressure, body mass index, physical inactivity, cholesterol levels, and diabetes rates -- may be genetically based.

 

Footer Links: