Winkleby Lab In the Prevention Research Center

FIPSE Scientific Abstract

Stanford/FIPSE School-Based Science Initiative

Part of the Fund for the Improvement of Post Secondary Education (FIPSE)

Funded by the Department of Education

Marilyn Winkleby, Principal Investigator

Need: To address the critical shortage of underrepresented ethnic minorities in bioscience and health careers, we have formed a partnership between a distinguished public health program at Stanford University and four California high schools. We will expand a highly successful 16-year-old university-based program to include a new school-based science program at rural Native-American, rural Latino, urban Latino, and urban African-American high schools.
Project design: Our major program components are school-based: 1) an academic year-long Science Program for sophomores and/or juniors (total of 240 students); and Stanford-based: 2) a one-day College-Life Workshop for all science program students and their parents (total of 240 students and 120 parents); 3) a five-week Summer Institute for selected science program students (total of 60 students); and 4) a three-day Science Teacher Summer Institute (about 8 teachers annually).
Curriculum: Our new Stanford/Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) model will include inquiry-based science, training on the scientific process, culturally relevant research projects, hospital and community-based internships, exposure to college life, interaction with health professionals, college and career advising, and long-term follow-up. Dissemination: Local efforts will assist science teachers in disseminating the model to other teachers and schools. National efforts will include a National Dissemination Committee initially composed of nine leading Schools of Medicine and Public Health in the U.S. currently offering science outreach programs to underrepresented minority students. The Committee will evaluate best practices of the existing programs, further refine the Stanford/FIPSE model, and promote dissemination to other Schools of Medicine and Public Health.
Evaluation: We will use process and outcome evaluation to assess school-based and university-based program implementation for students and teachers, as well as to assess the impact of local and national dissemination efforts.

Need: To address the critical shortage of underrepresented ethnic minorities in bioscience and health careers, we have formed a partnership between a distinguished public health program at Stanford University and four California high schools. We will expand a highly successful 16-year-old university-based program to include a new school-based science program at rural Native-American, rural Latino, urban Latino, and urban African-American high schools.
Project design: Our major program components are school-based: 1) an academic year-long Science Program for sophomores and/or juniors (total of 240 students); and Stanford-based: 2) a one-day College-Life Workshop for all science program students and their parents (total of 240 students and 120 parents); 3) a five-week Summer Institute for selected science program students (total of 60 students); and 4) a three-day Science Teacher Summer Institute (about 8 teachers annually).
Curriculum: Our new Stanford/Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) model will include inquiry-based science, training on the scientific process, culturally relevant research projects, hospital and community-based internships, exposure to college life, interaction with health professionals, college and career advising, and long-term follow-up. Dissemination: Local efforts will assist science teachers in disseminating the model to other teachers and schools. National efforts will include a National Dissemination Committee initially composed of nine leading Schools of Medicine and Public Health in the U.S. currently offering science outreach programs to underrepresented minority students. The Committee will evaluate best practices of the existing programs, further refine the Stanford/FIPSE model, and promote dissemination to other Schools of Medicine and Public Health.
Evaluation: We will use process and outcome evaluation to assess school-based and university-based program implementation for students and teachers, as well as to assess the impact of local and national dissemination efforts.

 

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